Frequently asked questions

Are all these pieces handmade?


I make every piece by hand, so it is quite time-consuming. Simply speaking, it's a 3-step process. First I use the clay to make the piece, then it air-dries. Then it goes into my kiln for the bisque firing (approximately 9 hours @ 1800 degrees). After it cools I apply the glaze and set it aside to dry again. Then into the kiln for the second firing (approximately 12 hours @ 2200 degrees). Then it cools for a day and a half...the finished piece is then sanded and cleaned and shipped to you!




Can I eat off of these pieces?


Yes...even the plates in my Native American collection (although most people prefer to hang those as artwork). I mix all of my own glazes and have worked hard to insure safety. We eat off of my plates everyday at home! Remember: It is important NOT to take one of my bowls out of the refrigerator into the oven. Thermal shock is the term - pieces need to be at room temperature to move from one process to another.




Can I use the pieces in the oven?


All my work is food safe, microwave safe, dishwasher safe...even the plates in my Native American collection (although most people prefer to hang these plates as artwork). It is important NOT to take one of my bowls out of the refrigerator into the oven. Thermal shock is the term - pieces need to be at room temperature to move from one process to another.




What is your "certificate of authenticity"?


For the Native American plates, I offer a Certificate of Authenticy. It states: " I certify that this piece of pottery is made in compliance with and protected by the American Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-644). I am an enrolled member of the Eel Ground First Nation of Mi'kmaq (Micmac) of New Brunswick, Canada."

The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-644) is a truth in advertising law that prohibits misrepresentation in marketing of Indian arts and crafts products within the United States. Accordingly, it is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian or Indian Tribe or Indian arts and crafts organization. This covers all Indian and Indian-style traditional and contemporary arts and crafts produced after 1935.




What is the American Indian Arts and Crafts Act?


This insures that the work you are buying is, indeed, created by a Native American. The Act states: The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-644) is a truth in advertising law that prohibits misrepresentation in marketing of Indian arts and crafts products within the United States. Accordingly, it is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product in a manner that falsely suggests it is Indian produced, an Indian product, or the product of a particular Indian or Indian Tribe or Indian arts and crafts organization. This covers all Indian and Indian-style traditional and contemporary arts and crafts produced after 1935.





FAQ

RAM Stoneware

T:   585-330-7351

E:  rick@ramstoneware.com

© 2017 RAM Stoneware. Proudly created with Wix.com

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Instagram Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Black Pinterest Icon
0